News Affecting Injured Workers

March 21, 2019 - WSIB workers stage walkout to protest staff shortage, internal chaos

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WSIB staffers staged a lunchtime protest on Thursday to call on their employer to address chronic shortages and other issues.

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Fred Han, Ontario president for the Canadian Union of Public Employees, which represents WSIB staff, said employees are under "enormous stress" as a result of staffing reductions and "repeated organizational change" at the board. 

"They are the backbone of the system" he said. "without these workers, there would be no workers' compensation system." 

By noon Thursday, around 100 WSIB employees had gathered on their lunch break to rally outside the building - the first of 13 protests organized for the coming weeks at WSIB offices around Ontario. 


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Written by Toronto Star Reporter

Sara Mojtehedzadeh

Mar. 12 , 2019 - WSIB confirms all rubber claims will be reviewed

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Ontario's Workplace Safety and Insurance Board says it wants to be abundantly clear — all local rubber worker claims made between 2002 and 2015 will be included in a sweeping review of occupational disease in the industry.

Earlier this week, the WSIB was accused of misleading some families about whether previously appealed cases will be reopened as part of that review.  Kitchener's Gayle Wannan says one of the WSIB specialists assigned to a review of more than 300 denied rubber claims told her not all cases will be reviewed.


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written by Waterloo Region Record Reporter

Greg Mercer

Mar. 12 , 2019 - WSIB ‘already made up their mind’ on rubber claims, Kitchener widow says

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Ontario's Workplace Safety and Insurance Board says it wants to be abundantly clear — all local rubber worker claims made between 2002 and 2015 will be included in a sweeping review of occupational disease in the industry.

Earlier this week, the WSIB was accused of misleading some families about whether previously appealed cases will be reopened as part of that review.  Kitchener's Gayle Wannan says one of the WSIB specialists assigned to a review of more than 300 denied rubber claims told her not all cases will be reviewed.


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written by Waterloo Region Record Reporter

Greg Mercer

Mar. 15, 2019 - WSIB refuses most applications for coverage for work-related chronic stress

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Just over a year ago, the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board released a new chronic mental stress policy. WSIB is now covering illness and injuries related to workplace stress in ways it never did before.

Work-related chronic mental stress is defined as an approximately diagnosed mental disorder that is predominantly caused by a substantial work-related stressor or a series of stressors. A work-related stressor would generally be substantial if it is excessive in intensity and/or duration compared with the normal pressures and tensions experienced by people working in similar circumstances. 


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Written by Ed Canning and submitted to the Hamilton Spectator

Mar. 5, 2019 - WSIB will be Reviewing appealed rubber claims

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Compensation claims from rubber workers who asked a government tribunal for a second look at their case will be included in a sweeping review by Ontario's Workplace Safety and Insurance Board. That decision appears to be an about-face from the WSIB, which on Monday said any previously-denied rubber claims that were appealed to the Workplace Safety & Insurance Appeal Tribunal (WSIAT) would not be reopened.

"That was a misunderstanding," explained WSIB spokesperson Christine Arnott. "They will definitely be included in this review."


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written by Waterloo Region Record Reporter

Greg Mercer

Mar. 11, 2019 - Tribunal rules employer offered its injured worker an unsuitable job

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THUNDER BAY — Ontario's Workplace Safety and Insurance Appeals Tribunal has ruled that an employer failed to provide suitable alternative work for a staff member who suffered an injury on the job.

The WSIAT held a hearing in Thunder Bay in December 2018, and its ruling was recently made public.

The case goes back to 2014 when the food service industry worker suffered a slip-and-fall accident that required hip surgery which left her with a shortened leg, mobility issues and pain.


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written by TBnewswatch.com Reporter

Greg Rinnie

Mar. 11, 2019 - Witmer celebrated by OGCA for health and safety commitment

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Elizabeth Witmer, chair of the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board, was honoured with the Doug Chalmers Award for Safety recently, presented by the Ontario General Contractors Association (OGCA). The award was presented to Witmer for her commitment to health and safety throughout her career. 

Elizabeth Witmer, chair of the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB), is the latest recipient of the Doug Chalmers Award for Safety, presented recently by the Ontario General Contractors Association (OGCA).

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Written by Daily Commercial news Reporter

Angela Gismondi

Jan. 5, 2019 - She was grabbed, endured sexual taunts and followed into the washroom. The WSIB says this wasn’t workplace harassment

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Margery Wardle, who had worked as a heavy equipment operator with the former City of Nepean, is show on the job at a tree farm in this updated photo. Her chronic mental stress claim was recently denied by the WSIB, which ruled her negative experiences on the job, including being subjected to sexually explicit comments, were simply "interpersonal conflict." 

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written by Toronto Star Reporter 

Sara Mojtehedzadeh

Feb. 21, 2019 - WSIB's 'call centre model' is 'failing vulnerable workers,' board staff say

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Employees at the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board say the new way of dealing with claims is hurting injured workers instead of helping them, documents show. 


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Written by Toronto Star Reporter

 

Sara Mojtehedzadeh

Mar. 6, 2019 - Temp agencies more likely to break law - but audits decline by 80 percent, WSIB documents show

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The provincial workers' compensation board conducted just 85 audits of temporary help agencies last year, down from 454 in 2016 - despite the fact its own internal reports have found temp agencies to be significantly more likely than other employers to break the law  documents obtained by the Star show.


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Written by Toronto Star Reporter

Sara Mojtehedzadeh

 

Dec. 7, 2018 - MPPs call on WSIB to review hundreds of denied claims from former rubber workers

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Gayle Wannan holds a photo of her husband, Lyden Wanna, who died of pancreatic cancer at age 49 after 26 years of working at Uniroyal (Photo by Mathew McCarthy).


Lynden Wannan worked at Uniroyal for 26 years, until the day he collapsed on the factory floor. He was dead in under a year at age 49. 

Wannan was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, a disease that started with nagging pain in his back and ended with the father of two rapidly deteriorating until his final death in 2001. 


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written by Waterloo Region Record Reporter

Greg Mercer

Dec. 10, 2018 - Rubber workers claims to be reviewed

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Gayle Wannan holds a photo of her husband, Lyden Wanna, who died of pancreatic cancer at age 49 after 26 years of working at Uniroyal (Photo by Mathew McCarthy).


The Chair of Ontario's WSIB is ordering the provincial agency to review hundreds of denied claims from rubber workers who believe their jobs made them sick.


The review comes after a series of stories by the Record that exposed the health legacy...


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written by Waterloo Region Record Reporter

Greg Mercer

Feb. 19, 2019 - WSIB had flagged rubber cases as disease cluster

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The former Epton Industries plant at King and Victoria street in Kitchener. 

Long before it publicly acknowledged rubber workers' compensation claims needed a second look, Ontario's Workplace Safety and Insurance Board was internally flagging the sector as a cluster of occupational disease.  

Emails released through a Freedom of Information (FOI) request show the board considered rubber workers as one of five specialty cases- along with firefighters, herbicide sprayers, miners exposed to McIntyre Powder, and General Electric workers.


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written by Waterloo Region Record Reporter

Greg Mercer